I bought a nice stack of books recently, and I'm planning on buying some more. There's a lot of good stuff, not only new books, but also some older books (as in from 2004, I'm not talking about the C++ books on my shelf).

Currently reading:

On the stack (in no particular order):

Yet to arrive or to be bought:

Books I'm considering to buy:

  • xUnit Test Patterns. More than 800 on refactoring tests. The website already offers a lot of material, but also states that it might've been outdated by the book already.

There's also the occasional novel to be squeezed in. Oh well, lots of stuff to read I reckon. Thank goodness that the weekend is near. Time to read.

Tags: books, links

The RSpec and Behaviour-Driven Development edition: * Behaviour-Driven Development. An excellent introduction to RSpec and BDD by Bruce Tate.

Tags: links, rails, rspec, ruby
Tags: links, rails, ruby
Tags: links, miscellany
Tags: links, rails, ruby

It's been a week full of Rails joy, and a little pain as well, but that's not to looked for in Rails itself, but just some code.

  • Been working with attachment_fu this week. Basically tried out its S3 storage capabilities when I switched from a custom implementation. Pretty neato. I'm starting to dig S3 itself more and more. Mike Clark wrote a nice tutorial on the subject.

  • In his newest tutorial on developerWorks, Bruce Tate writes about using RSpec for behaviour-driven testing. Good stuff, I'm looking forward to the tutorial at RailsConf Europe about Behavious-Driven Development.

  • Chris Wanstrath introduces Ambition, an ActiveRecord extension that makes finding objects more Ruby-like. Being able to write

    User.select { |u| u.email =~ /chris/ }.first
    

    instead of

    User.find(:first, :conditions => ["email = chris"])`  
    

    feels at least a little bit more Ruby-ish. Still pretty new, but it looks promising. The full, glorious joy of features can be read in the README.

  • Finally, the Softies on Rails talk about what you always knew deep in your ruby-red heart: Hashes are Cool!

Tags: links, rails, ruby

Friday's tab sweep for a little weekend reading.

Tags: links, rails, ruby

Have a RESTful weekend with some REST-related reading, some of it already a little older, but it's gotten more important to me recently: * Refactoring DayTrader to REST. An article on refactoring an existing application to use REST.

Tags: links, macosx, rails

Another week, another sweep.

Tags: links, rails, ruby

Lots of open tabs to be swept. Brace yourselves.

Git

Can you tell I'm looking into Git right now?

Ruby

Rails

Mac OS X

  • Secrets. An ever-growing list of hidden preferences. Comes with a handy-dandy preference pane.
Tags: links, macosx, rails, ruby
Tags: links, rails, ruby
  • QuickLook and TextMate, sitting in a tree. Makes QuickLook even better. It integrates the TextMate syntax highlighting into QuickLook, and integrates QuickLook into TextMate. Looks pretty neat. TextMate in QuickLook

  • Ruby Tool Survey
    It's official (as far as this survey goes): TextMate is the number one development tool for Ruby and Rails. That's what I tried to tell the students during the lecture I gave last weekend, but the die-hard Linux fans wouldn't believe me ;)

  • Nginx and Mongrel for Rails
    Nice tutorial on how to set up Nginx for Rails deployment. I'm using it on one of my current projects and it's pretty neat. RailsJitsu is well worth keeping an eye on.

  • Scripting the Leopard Termina
    Tired of having to open four terminal session each time you open Terminal to work on your Rails applications? Get some nice hints on how to script Terminal with AppleScript to ease the pain on your fingers.

  • Inject Ruby into a Running OS X Application
    Just cool. Nuff said.

Tags: links, rails, ruby

Today's NetNewsWire tab sweep:

  • DataMapper - Competition for ActiveRecord - Not available at the moment, cached on the Googles.
    Looks like a nice alternative to ActiveRecord, especially for standalone environments without Rails. Being able to put queries, especially simpler ones, in Ruby code is quite appealing.

  • The Great Ruby Shoot-Out
    Antonio Cangiano compared the current Ruby implementations. JRuby, Ruby 1.9 and Rubinius look awesome, at least by the numbers.

  • Upcoming Changes to the JavaScript Language
    I'm still not sure if I'm gonna like what's coming. JavaScript is on the way to turning into a full-blown and statically typed object-oriented language, but with all its pros and cons. It looks a lot like C++, and if that's no a little bit scary, I don't know what is.

  • Google Chart API
    Now that's a really useful API. Put in your data via HTTP request and get back chart images. Awesome.

  • SVNMate
    A TextMate plugin to integrate Subversion, taking the integration further than the Subversion bundle.

  • Rak
    grep in Ruby, ignores .svn and CVS directories. Accepts regular expression in Ruby syntax, and can execute Ruby code on the results.

  • The Evolution of Java
    Right on.

On a side node, Rails 2.0 has been released. I recommend checking out the PeepCode book on Rails 2.0 to check what's new and what's old.

Update: Ryan Daigle (author of aforementioned book) also has a nice collection on a lot of the changes and new features in Rails 2.0.

Tags: java, links, rails, ruby