Spring’s New Maintenance Policy

If Rails was anything like Spring, we wouldn’t see a 2.1.2 release anymore:

“After a new major version of Spring is released, community maintenance updates will be issued for three months to address initial stability issues. Subsequent maintenance releases will be available to SpringSource Enterprise customers. Bug fixes will be folded into the open source development trunk and will be made available in the next major community release of the software . . . “

Right on. I can understand that SpringSource has to make money somehow, but way to screw over the community like that. But given the enormous amounts of money put into it by investors it’s no surprise really.

Via TheServerSide.

Why Refactoring Matters

It’s hard to believe, but for some people it still doesn’t. I’ve heard something along the lines of “The refactoring is done, now we can code again” or “I can’t refactor that code right now, I’ll just add a little code here and be done with it” far too often over the last months and years. The irrational but persistent thought that refactoring is a once-in-a-product-lifecycle activity is an annoyingly sticky idiom. Refactoring is not a one time thing, it is (or at least should be) an important part of your development process, equally important as coding and testing.

Why Testing Matters

Sometimes it’s easy to forget, just how important testing has become in the development lifecycle. I recently had to remind myself and others that there are no reasonable excuses not to write tests. I would go as far as saying you’re jeopardizing the quality of your software, just because you had no time, were pushed by management, or were just plain lazy.